Welcome to the New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies

Nau mai, haere mai ki te Puna Akorangi o Aotearoa mo te Tangata me te Kararehe
NZCHAS brings together scholars from the humanities and social sciences whose research is concerned with the conceptual and material treatment of nonhuman animals in culture, society and history.

Mondry - Political Animals

Political Animals: Dogs in Modern Russian Culture

NZCHAS member Professor Henrietta Mondry has just published magisterial study of the place of the dog and of human-canine relationships in Russian culture, life and politics.

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Animals in Emergencies

Animals in Emergencies: Learning from the Christchurch Earthquakes

This richly-illustrated book by NZCHAS members Annie Potts and Donelle Gadenne vividly recounts the experiences of many Christchurch residents, human and animal alike, during the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes and their aftermath. The authors analyse these accounts to offer practical lessons in emergency animal management.

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Read the review by internationally-renowned expert in animal behaviour, Professor Marc Bekoff.

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Sara Wagstaff and Lilly

Featured Postgraduate Researcher: Sara Wagstaff

Sara's research centres on horse-human relations in Heathcote Valley, and at Heathcote Valley Riding School in particular. She is critically exploring these relations (and her representation of them) within a frame of situated, practicing communities, and in the context of Christchurch earthquakes. .

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NEWS

 

Product DetailsMendel's Ark: Biotechnology and the Future of Extinction

NZCHAS member Dr Amy Fletcher has just published a ground-breaking study of the ethical, cultural and social implications of using biotechnological tools to reverse the extinction of species.

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A New Zealand Book of BeastsA New Zealand Book of Beasts: Animals in our History, Culture and Everyday Life

Three NZCHAS members, Associate Professors Annie Potts, Philip Armstrong and Deidre Brown, have just published the first comprehensive human-animal studies analysis of New Zealand's history, literature, visual arts, popular culture and everday life.

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